Product SiteDocumentation Site

Fedora 11

Release Notes

Release Notes for Fedora 11

Logo

Rüdiger Landmann

Installation Release Notes 

Jens Petersen

Internationalization Release Notes 

John McDonough

Amateur Radio Release Notes 

Dale Bewley

Virtualization Release Notes 

Legal Notice

Copyright © 2009 Fedora Documentation Project. This material may only be distributed subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the Open Publication License, V1.0, (the latest version is presently available at http://www.opencontent.org/openpub/).
Fedora and the Fedora Infinity Design logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Red Hat, Inc., in the U.S. and other countries.
Red Hat and the Red Hat "Shadow Man" logo are registered trademarks of Red Hat Inc. in the United States and other countries.
All other trademarks and copyrights referred to are the property of their respective owners.
Documentation, as with software itself, may be subject to export control. Read about Fedora Project export controls at http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Legal/Export.
Abstract
This document details the release notes for Fedora 11.

1. Welcome to Fedora 11
1.1. Fedora 11 Overview
1.2. Hardware Requirements
1.3. Welcome to Fedora
1.4. Feedback
2. Installation Notes
2.1. Installation in text mode
2.2. Upgrade Notes
2.3. Boot menu
2.4. boot.iso now works on systems with UEFI
3. Architecture Specific Notes
3.1. PPC Specifics for Fedora
3.2. x86 Specifics for Fedora
3.3. x86_64 Specifics for Fedora
4. Changes in Fedora for Desktop users
4.1. Fedora Desktop
4.2. Networking
4.3. Printing
4.4. International Language Support
4.5. Multimedia
4.6. Games and Entertainment
4.7. Fedora Live Images
5. Changes in Fedora for System Administrators
5.1. Fedora 11 Boot Time
5.2. Security
5.3. Virtualization
5.4. Web and Content Servers
5.5. Mail Servers
5.6. Database Servers
5.7. File Servers
5.8. Samba (Windows Compatibility)
5.9. System Daemons
5.10. Server Tools
5.11. File Systems
5.12. X Window System (Graphics)
6. Changes in Fedora for developers
6.1. Development
6.2. Runtime
6.3. Tools
6.4. Java
6.5. Eclipse
6.6. Haskell
6.7. Embedded Development
6.8. Backwards Compatibility
6.9. Linux Kernel
7. Changes in Fedora for specific audiences
7.1. What's new in science and mathematics
7.2. Electronic Design Automation
7.3. What's new for amateur radio operators
A. Legal Information
A.1. License
A.2. Trademarks
A.3. External References
A.4. Export
A.5. Legal Information
A.6. More Information
B. Revision History

1. Welcome to Fedora 11

1.1. Fedora 11 Overview

This beat is located here: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Docs/Beats/OverView

As always, Fedora continues to develop (http://www.fedoraproject.org/wiki/RedHatContributions) and integrate the latest free and open source software (http://www.fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features). The following sections provide a brief overview of major changes from the last release of Fedora. For more details about other features that are included in Fedora 11, refer to their individual wiki pages that detail feature goals and progress:
Throughout the release cycle, there are interviews with the developers behind key features giving out the inside story:
The following are major features for Fedora 11:
  • Automatic font and mime-type installation - PackageKit was introduced in Fedora 9 as a cross-distro software management application for users. The capabilities it offers thanks to integration with the desktop became more visible in Fedora 10, where it provided automatic codec installation. Now in Fedora 11, PackageKit extends this functionality with the ability to automatically install fonts where needed for viewing and editing documents. It also includes the capability to install handlers for specific content types as needed. Some work is still being completed to provide automatic installation of applications.
  • Volume Control - Currently, people using Fedora have to go through many levels of mixers in different applications to properly set up sound sources. These are all exposed in the volume control on the desktop, making for a very confusing user experience. PulseAudio allows us to unify the volume controls in one interface that makes setting up sound easier and more pain-free.
  • Intel, ATI and Nvidia kernel modsetting - Fedora 10 provided the first steps by a major distribution into using the kernel modesetting (KMS) feature to speed up graphical boot. We indicated at the time that we would be adding greater support for additional video cards as time went on. KMS originally was featured only on some ATI cards. In Fedora 11, this work is extended to include many more video cards, including Intel and Nvidia, and additional ATI as well. Although not fully complete, we have increased enormously the video card coverage of the KMS feature, with more to come.
  • Fingerprint - Extensive work has been done to make fingerprint readers easy to use as an authentication mechanism. Currently, using fingerprint readers is a bit of a pain, and installing/using fprint and its pam module take more time than should ever be necessary. The goal of this feature is to make it painless by providing all the required pieces in Fedora, together with nicely integrated configuration. To enable this functionality the user will register their fingerprints on the system as part of user account creation. After doing so, they will easily be able to log in and authenticate seamlessly using a simple finger swipe. This greatly simplifies one element of identity management and is a great step in the evolution of the linux desktop.
  • IBus input method system - ibus has been rewritten in C and is the new default input method for Asian languages. It allows input methods to be added and removed dynamically during a desktop session. It supports Chinese (pinyin, libchewing, tables), Indic (m17n), Japanese (anthy), Korean (libhangul), and more. There are still some features missing compared to scim so testing is strongly encouraged and reports of problems and suggestions for improvements welcome.
Some other features in this release include:
  • Ext4 filesystem - The ext3 file system has remained the mature standard in Linux for a long time. The ext4 file system is a major update that has an improved design, even better performance and reliability, support for much larger storage, and very fast file system checks and file deletions. It is now the default filesystem for new installations.
  • Virt Improved Console - In Fedora 10 and earlier the virtual guest console is limited to a screen resolution of 800x600. In Fedora 11 the goal is to have the screen default to at least 1024x768 resolution out of the box. New installations of F11 provide the ability to use other interface devices in the virtual guest, such as a USB tablet, which the guest will automatically detect and configure. Among the results is a mouse pointer that tracks the local client pointer one-for-one, and providing expanded capabilities.
  • MinGW (Windows cross compiler) - Fedora 11 provides MinGW, a development environment for Fedora users who wish to cross-compile their programs to run on Windows without having to use Windows. In the past developers have had to port and compile all of the libraries and tools they have needed, and this huge effort has happened independently many times over. MinGW eliminates duplication of work for application developers by providing a range of libraries and development tools already ported to the cross-compiler environment. Developers don't have to recompile the application stack themselves, but can concentrate just on the changes needed to their own application.
Features for Fedora 11 tracked on the feature list page:

1.2. Hardware Requirements

This beat is located here: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Docs/Beats/HardwareOverview

1.2.1. Processor and memory requirements for PPC Architectures

  • Minimum CPU: PowerPC G3 / POWER3
  • Fedora 11 supports the New World generation of Apple Power Macintosh, shipped from circa 1999 onward. Although Old World machines should work, they require a special bootloader which is not included in the Fedora distribution. Fedora has also been installed and tested on POWER5 and POWER6 machines.
  • Fedora 11 supports pSeries and Cell Broadband Engine machines.
  • Fedora 11 also supports the Sony PlayStation 3 and Genesi Pegasos II and Efika.
  • Fedora 11 includes new hardware support for the P.A. Semiconductor 'Electra' machines.
  • Fedora 11 also includes support for Terrasoft Solutions powerstation workstations.
  • Recommended for text-mode: 233 MHz G3 or better, 128MiB RAM.
  • Recommended for graphical: 400 MHz G3 or better, 256MiB RAM.

1.2.2. Processor and memory requirements for x86 Architectures

The following CPU specifications are stated in terms of Intel processors. Other processors, such as those from AMD, Cyrix, and VIA that are compatible with and equivalent to the following Intel processors, may also be used with Fedora. Fedora 11 requires an Intel Pentium or better processor, and is optimized for Pentium 4 and later processors.
  • Recommended for text-mode: 200 MHz Pentium-class or better
  • Recommended for graphical: 400 MHz Pentium II or better
  • Minimum RAM for text-mode: 128MiB
  • Minimum RAM for graphical: 192MiB
  • Recommended RAM for graphical: 256MiB

1.2.3. Processor and memory requirements for x86_64 architectures

  • Minimum RAM for text-mode: 256MiB
  • Minimum RAM for graphical: 384MiB
  • Recommended RAM for graphical: 512MiB

1.2.4. Hard disk space requirements for all architectures

The complete packages can occupy over 9 GB of disk space. Final size is entirely determined by the installing spin and the packages selected during installation. Additional disk space is required during installation to support the installation environment. This additional disk space corresponds to the size of /Fedora/base/stage2.img (on Installation Disc 1) plus the size of the files in /var/lib/rpm on the installed system.
In practical terms, additional space requirements may range from as little as 90 MiB for a minimal installation to as much as an additional 175 MiB for a larger installation.
Additional space is also required for any user data, and at least 5% free space should be maintained for proper system operation.

1.3. Welcome to Fedora

This beat is located here: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Docs/Beats/Welcome

Fedora is a Linux-based operating system that showcases the latest in free and open source software. Fedora is always free for anyone to use, modify, and distribute. It is built by people across the globe who work together as a community: the Fedora Project. The Fedora Project is open and anyone is welcome to join. The Fedora Project is out front for you, leading the advancement of free, open software and content.

Note

Visit http://docs.fedoraproject.org/release-notes/ to view the latest release notes for Fedora, especially if you are upgrading. If you are migrating from a release of Fedora older than the immediately previous one, you should refer to older Release Notes for additional information.
You can help the Fedora Project community continue to improve Fedora if you file bug reports and enhancement requests. Refer to http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/BugsAndFeatureRequests for more information about bug and feature reporting. Thank you for your participation.
To find out more general information about Fedora, refer to the following Web pages:

1.4. Feedback

Thank you for taking the time to provide your comments, suggestions, and bug reports to the Fedora community; this helps improve the state of Fedora, Linux, and free software worldwide.

1.4.1.  Providing Feedback on Fedora Software

To provide feedback on Fedora software or other system elements, please refer to http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/BugsAndFeatureRequests. A list of commonly reported bugs and known issues for this release is available from http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Bugs/F11Common.

1.4.2.  Providing Feedback on Release Notes

If you feel these release notes could be improved in any way, you can provide your feedback directly to the beat writers. There are several ways to provide feedback, in order of preference: